The NHS Security Training Programme comprises 8 modules

Module 1: Key Bodies, Security in Healthcare Settings and Components of Security
Module 2: Professional Conduct Expectations
Module 3: Relevant Legislation
Module 4: Healthcare Security Procedures
Module 5: Communication Skills & Conflict Management
Module 6: Violence in the NHS
Module 7: Assault Avoidance
Module 8: Physical Intervention & Restraint Skills

Already SIA Trained?

The AEGIS Training Programme for Healthcare Security Officers acknowledges the benefits of SIA Licence-linked training for Security Guards and Door Supervisors and facilitates those who are already SIA qualified to ‘Top Up’ to the new Training Standard defined by the NAHS without having to undertake the ‘Full’ AEGIS Programme, (thereby avoiding expensive overlap of training.)

If this is you, please see ‘Top Up’ training.sia-sg-licence-125x125

sia-ds-licence125x125SIA-LogoNHS Security Training Programme – Index of Contents

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NOTE: ‘Top Up’ Training elements are shown in Blue Text

Module 1: Key Bodies, Security in Healthcare Settings and Components of Security

Unit 1: Key bodies in the Private Security Industry 1.1 Security Industry Authority (SIA), 1.2 Skills for Security, 1.3 National Security Inspectorate (NSI), 1.4 British Standards Institution (BSI), 1.5 International Professional Security Association, 1.6 British Security Industry Association (BSIA), 1.7 The Security Institute. Unit 2: Key bodies within the NHS 2.1 NHS Counter Fraud Authority (NHSCFA), 2.2 NHS Digital, 2.3 The National Data Guardian (NDG)
2.4 Care Quality Commission (CQC), 2.5 National Institute for Health & Care Excellence (NICE), 2.6 National Association for Healthcare Security. Unit 3: Security in Healthcare Settings 3.1 The purpose of Security in Healthcare Settings, 3.2 Healthcare assets need protection, 3.3 Generic NHS Security Management Objectives, 3.4 A Risk Based Approach, 3.5 Anti-Crime work in the NHS. Unit 4: Information Security 4.1 Information Security Management
4.2 Information Security – Legal requirements, 4.3 Information Security – Guidance and Codes of Practice, 4.4 Information Security – Quality Assurance, 4.5 Information Security Management Objectives, 4.6 The NHS Data Security and Protection Toolkit, 4.7 Information Security Policy, 4.8 Information Security Governance, 4.9 The Caldicott Guardian, 4.10 Information Classification, 4.11 Information Security Breach, 4.12 Personal Data Breach. 4.13 Information Security – Staff responsibilities, 4.14 Communicating, sharing and gaining information, 4.15 Information Security – Staff Training. Unit 5: Fraud, Bribery and Corruption 5.1 Fraud in the NHS, 5.2 Bribery & Corruption, 5.3 Local Counter Fraud Specialist (LCFS), 5.4 NHSCFA Quality Assurance Programme
5.5 If you suspect fraud, bribery or corruption, 5.6 Reporting Suspicions of fraud, bribery and corruption. Unit 6: Security Management 6.1 Theft in the NHS, 6.2 Higher Risk of Theft, 6.3 Higher Risk Areas – NHS Security, 6.4 Security Management, 6.5 Strategic Governance, 6.6 Security Management Strategy
6.7 Security Management Work, 6.8 Key areas of action, 6.9 Components of Security, 6.10 Security Control Rooms, 6.11 Healthcare Security Officer Tasks, 6.12 Equipment required by a Security Officer, 6.13 Quality Assurance of Security Management Standards. 6.14 National Strategies for Crime Reduction & Protection of Vulnerable Persons, 6.15 The role of the NHS (in national strategies).

Module 2: Professional Conduct Expectations

Unit 1: Healthcare Security Officer – Role Responsibilities 1.1 The Healthcare Security Officer Role, 1.2 SIA Standards of Behaviour for Security Operatives, 1.3 Legal Responsibilities and Duty of Care, Unit 2: Qualities required of Healthcare Security Officers 2.1 Qualities required of Healthcare Security Officers, 2.2 Propriety, 2.3 Integrity, 2.4 Professionalism and Expertise, 2.5 Fairness and Objectivity, 2.6 Vision, 2.7 Confidentiality, 2.8 Professional Image, 2.9 Infection Control and Hygiene, 2.10 In times of trouble. Unit 3: Patient Focus 3.1 Patient Focus, 3.2 Happy patients means more funding, 3.3 Security Officers are expected to contribute to the strategic aim, 3.4 It is not just about the patients, 3.5 Appreciate the difficulties the patient/visitor may be facing, 3.6 Appreciate the difficulties that NHS Staff may be facing, 3.7 Signs indicating stress overload, 3.8 Be as tolerant and forgiving as possible, 3.9 Resolve to be a Peacemaker, 3.10 Peaceful solutions are best, 3.11 Qualities of a Peacemaker. Unit 4: Dynamic Risk Assessment 4.1 Dynamic Risk Assessment, 4.2 The five stages of DRA, 4.3 Dynamic Risk Assessment Flowchart, 4.4 The ‘Safe Person’ concept is central to effective Dynamic Risk Assessment. Unit 5: Awareness, Active Threat Assessment & Decision Making 5.1 Awareness, 5.2 Active Threat Assessment, 5.3 Decision Making (NDM).

Module 3: Relevant Legislation

Unit 1: Civil & Criminal Law 1.1 Civil Law, 1.2 Criminal Law, 1.3 Methods of Disposal, Unit 2: Citizens’ Powers of Arrest 2.1 Citizens’ Powers to Arrest. Unit 3: Reasonable Force 3.1 Reasonable Force, 3.2 Reasonable Excuse, 3.3 Lawful Authority, 3.4 Criminal Law. Unit 4: Civil Law on Trespass 4.1 Civil Law on Trespass, 4.2 Police Action – Trespassers, 4.3 Attempted re-entry. Unit 5: Human Rights 5.1 The Human Rights Act 1998, 5.2 What are Human Rights? 5.4 The Human Rights Act 1988 – Protocols, 5.5 Physical Intervention and the Human Rights Act. Unit 6: Data Protection 6.1 The rationale for the Data Protection legislation, 6.2 The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), 6.3 The Data Protection Act 2018, 6.4 DPA 2018 – Key Terms, 6.5 Data Protection Principles, 6.6 Data Protection – Citizens rights, 6.7 DPA 2018 – Organisational requirements, 6.8 DPA 2018 – Offences, 6.9 Enforcement. Unit 7: Freedom of Information Act 7.1 Freedom of Information Act 2000. Unit 8: Equality Legislation 8.1 Equal Rights, 8.2 The Legislation, 8.3 The protected characteristics, 8.4 Prohibited conduct, 8.5 Areas where equality legislation applies, 8.6 When discrimination is not unlawful, 8.7 The Public Sector Equality Duty, 8.8 The Regulator for Equality. Unit 9: Healthcare Related Legislation 9.1 Overview, 9.2 Mental Health Act 1983, 9.3 The Mental Capacity Act 2005
9.4 Mental Health Act 2007, 9.5 Liberty Protection Safeguards, 9.6 The Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 (‘CJIA 2008’), 9.7 The Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Act 2018, 9.8 The Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018. Unit 10: Law relating to Children & Young Persons 10.1 Definition of ‘Child’, 10.2 Children’s Rights, 10.3 Duty of Care, 10.4 The Paramountcy Principle, 10.6 The age of criminal responsibility, 10.7 Physical Restraint of Children.

Module 4: Healthcare Security Procedures

Unit 1: Assignment Instructions 1.1 Assignment Instructions. Unit 2: Hand-Over Procedures. 2.1 Hand-Over Procedures. Unit 3: Contacting the Emergency Services 3.1 Contacting the Emergency Services, 3.2 Facilitating Police attendance onsite. Unit 4: Health & Safety 4.1 Health & Safety
4.2 Employers Duties – Health & Safety Legislation, 4.3 Health & Safety Risk Assessment, 4.4 General Principles of Prevention, 4.5 RIDDOR, 4.6 Safety Signs,
4.7 Manual Handling, Unit 5: Emergency Procedures 5.1 Emergency Procedures 5.2 NHS Emergency Preparedness, Resilience and Response (EPRR) Planning. Unit 6: First Aid Procedures 6.1 First Aid Procedures, Unit 7: Fire Safety – Awareness & Prevention, 7.1 Fire, 7.2 Fire Classifications, 7.3 How Fire Spreads, 7.4 Basic Fire Prevention, 7.5 Fire Extinguishers, 7.6 Other Fire Fighting Equipment, 7.7 Action on discovering a fire, 7.8 Fire Evacuation Procedures, 7.9 Common causes of fire in healthcare settings. Unit 8: Controlling Access & Egress 8.1 The purposes of controlling Access & Egress, 8.2 Access Control Basics, 8.3 Methods used to control Access & Egress. Unit 9: Lockdown Procedures 9.1 Lockdown, 9.2 Types of Lockdown, 9.3 Controlling Access in the event of a Lockdown, 9.4 Controlling Egress in the event of a Lockdown. Unit 10: Counter Terrorism Measures, 10.1 Terrorism, 10.2 UK Government Counter Terrorism Strategy, 10.3 Counter Terrorism Measures, 10.4 Suspicious Behaviour, 10.5 Bomb Threats, 10.6 Suspicious Packages, 10.7 Biological Weapons, 10.8 Information to News Media. Unit 11: Reporting 11.1 Written Communication, 11.2 Security Officer’s Notebook, 11.3 Writing Reports
11.4 Recording Use of Physical Force, 11.5 Reporting Use of Physical Force, 11.6 Accounting for Use of Physical Force. Unit 12: Property Lost and Found 12.1 Property Found, 12.2 Record in Notebook, 12.3 Valuables and Money, 12.4 Property handed to a Security Officer on patrol, 12.5 Depositing Property Found
12.6 Restoring Property Found, 12.7 Property Reported Lost to a Security Officer on patrol, 12.8 Return to Finder, if owner cannot be traced, 12.9 Analysis of records. Unit 13: Patrolling 13.1 The Purpose of Patrolling, 13.2 Types of Patrol, 13.3 Preparation for Patrol, 13.4 Observation, 13.5 Perception, 13.6 Memory, 13.7 Interactive Effects of Observations, Perception and Memory, 13.8 Operational Techniques for Effective Patrolling, 13.9 Special Considerations, 13.10 Patrolling Healthcare Premises, 13.11 Conclusions. Unit 14: Wandering Patients/Missing Persons 14.1 Wandering Patients/Missing Persons, 14.2 Understanding and Balancing the Risks, Vulnerable People, 14.3 Definitions used in the NHS, 14.4 Low, Medium and High-Risk Patients, 14.5 Action in response to a Low-Risk Missing Patient, 14.6 Actions in response to a Medium-Risk Missing Patient (including all AWOLs), 14.7 Actions to be taken in response to High-Risk Missing Patients, 14.8 Legal Authority to recover ‘Missing Patients’, 14.9 Missing Patients – Security Support, 14.10 Recovering Missing Patients – Tact, Persuasion and Patience, Doctrine of Necessity, 14.11 Additional Police Powers. Unit 15: Searching 15.1 Reasons for searching, 15.3 The legality of a search, 15.4 Before conducting a search, 15.5 NHS Trust Policy, 15.6 Consent, 15.7 Search Technology, 15.8 Types of Search, 15.9 General Rules, 15.10 A ‘Rub Down’ Search, 15.11 Search of Employer’s Premises, 15.12 Searching an Employee’s Locker, 15.13 Searching Vehicles, 15.14 What to do with items found
15.15 After a Search, 15.16 Search Documentation. Unit 16: Procedures for Prohibited Items 16.1 Suspected Possession (or discovery) of Firearms, 16.2 Possession of Weapons Other Than Firearms, 16.3 Possession of Controlled Drugs, Alcohol and Other Prohibited Substances. Unit 17: Prisoners attending for treatment 17.1 Prisoners attending for treatment, 17.2 Prisoners to Hospital – Security Arrangements, 17.3 Prisoners in Handcuffs, 17.4 Electronic Tags. Unit 18: Making Arrests 18.1 Making Arrests, 18.2 Reasonable grounds, 18.3 Arrest means to Stop and Detain, 18.4 What to say, 18.5 Always work to optimise your safety, 18.6 Challenging Suspects, 18.7 Assisting the police. Unit 19: Evidence 19.1 Evidence, 19.2 Types of Evidence, 19.3 Crime Scene Preservation. Unit 20: Video recording on NHS Premises 20.1 Video recording in NHS Hospitals, 20.2 Body Worn Video.

Module 5: Communication Skills & Conflict Management

Unit 1. Communication Skills 1.1 Communication Skills 1.2 Barriers to communication 1.3 Avoid Communication Breakdown 1.4 Communication begins before words are spoken 1.5 Non verbal communication – body language 1.6 Eye Contact 1.7 The Triangle of Gaze 1.8 Attitude ‘Lock In’ 1.9 A Positive Care Attitude 1.10 What kind of impression will you make? 1.11 Be ready for abuse 1.12 Listening Skills 1.13 Speaking 1.14 Avoid ‘Triggering’ violence 1.15 If someone is already wound up 1.16 During confrontations 1.17 Warning Signs 1.18 Danger Signs 1.19 Being Assertive 1.20 Always have an ‘Exit Strategy’ Unit 2. Conflict Management 2.1 Conflict 2.2 What causes conflict? 2.3 The effects 2.4 Conflict is inevitable – Violence is not! 2.5 Baseline needs 2.6 When called to a conflict situation 2.7 Managing a dispute 2.8 The Five Styles of Conflict Management 2.9 Managing a conflict 2.10 Always look to achieve a ‘win, win’ solution 2.11 Always establish needs 2.12 Involve the person in the solution 2.13 See things through 2.14 Working with colleagues to de-escalate conflict 2.15 Conflict Resolution Models Unit 3. Radio Communications 3.1 Radio Communications 3.2 Care of Equipment 3.3 The Radio Network 3.4 Radio Call Signs 3.5 Signal Strengths 3.6 Radio Discipline 3.7 Radio Procedures 3.8 When speaking on the radio 3.9 Pro Words 3.10 The Phonetic Alphabet 3.11 Phonetic Numbers 3.12 The 24-Hour Clock 3.13 Personal Radio users should be aware 3.14 Summoning Assistance by Personal Radio 3.15 A ‘Sectored’ Workplace 3.16 Coded Radio ‘Language’ Unit 4. Question Technique 4.1 The Purpose of Questioning 4.2 Open and Closed Questions 4.3 Probing Questions 4.4. Leading/Loaded Questions 4.5 Rhetorical Questions 4.6 Investigative Interviews 4.7 The PEACE Model of Investigation 4.8 Interview Technique 4.9 Nervous Suspects – Clues.

Module 6: Violence in the NHS

Unit 1: Overview, Statistics & Sanctions 1.1 Overview 1.2 Physical Assault Statistics 1.3 Unintentional Assaults 1.4 Sanctions & Prosecutions Unit 2: Risk Controls 2.1 Organisational Risk Controls 2.2 Risk Controls for Violence Unit 3: Reducing the Risks 3.1 A ‘whole organisation’ approach 3.2 Employing ‘social science’ 3.3 Applying common sense 3.4 Reporting concerns, incidents and ‘near misses’ 3.5 Contributing to the development of safer practice Unit 4: Factors that increase the risks 4.1 Contributory factors to violence Unit 5: Higher Risk Tasks, Departments and Patient Groups 5.1 Higher Risk Tasks 5.2 Higher Risk Departments 5.3 Higher Risk Patient Groups Unit 6 – Challenging Behaviour 6.1 What is Challenging Behaviour 6.2 Understanding Challenging Behaviour 6.3 Clinically Related Challenging Behaviour 6.4 Why Challenging Behaviour occurs 6.5 Where does Challenging Behaviour occur? 6.6 When does Challenging Behaviour occur? 6.7 Challenging Behaviour – Risk Reduction Unit 7 – Recognising Mental Ill Health and Learning Disability 7.1 Mental ill Health and/or Learning Disabilities 7.2 Characteristic Behaviour 7.3 Visible Signs 7.4 Patient’s Notes & Crisis Cards 7.5 Other information Sources 7.6 Direct Questioning Unit 8 – Pre-cursors to Violence 8.1 Common Pre-cursors to Violence Unit 9 – Tactics for de-escalation 9.1 In the event of imminent violence 9.2 De-escalation strategy 9.3 Psychotic Patients Unit 10: Safeguarding 10.1 Performing Safeguarding 10.2 Always obtain clear guidance and instructions from the senior clinician 10.3 Ensure appropriate staffing for the task 10.4 How restrictive should safeguarding measures be?
10.5 Sitting prevents rapid response 10.6 On the principle of minimal restraint 10.7 The ‘duty of care’ to keep the patient (and others) safe will always be paramount 10.8 Strategic positioning 10.9 Assessing the environment 10.10 The legal time restriction on Security Officers ‘guarding’ patients 10.11 Recognising behaviour as a form of communication 10.12 Keeping things calm and slow 10.13 Use open, calming, body language 10.14 Personalise introductions 10.15 Give the person longer than normal time to respond 10.16 Concentrate on listening 10.17 What to say 10.18 If the person is very disturbed/distressed 10.19 Things to avoid saying, 10.20 Don’t leave without saying Goodbye 10.21 Always remember the difference you could make Unit 11 – Self-Harm Awareness 11.1 What is Self-Harm? 11.2 Attention seeking behaviour – or not? 11.3 Why do people self-harm? 11.4 Pain as an emotional analgesic 11.5 Reasons for non-suicidal self-harm 11.6 How Common is Self-Harm? 11.7 Who is at risk of non-suicidal self-harm? 11.8 Methods of self-harming 11.9 Self-harming can be highly addictive and dangerous 11.10 Stopping 11.11 Interrupting the cycle of self-harm 11.12 Examples of non-harmful ‘distractions’ that can help 11. 13 Don’t underestimate the strength of the urge to self-harm 11.14 How Healthcare Security Officers can support people who self-harm. 

Module 7: Assault Avoidance

Unit 1. Posture and Stance 1.1 Posture 1.2 Normal Stance 1.3 Defensive Stance Unit 2. Personal Space Effects 2.1 Sensing Danger 2.2 The Fight or Flight Response 2.3 Personal Space is a two-way thing 2.4 Distance Is Safety 2.5 Demanding Personal Space Unit 3. Strategic Positioning 3.1 Avoid standing ‘square on’ to Service Users 3.2 Talking with your Hands 3.3 Precautions for close proximity conversations 3.4 Positional advantage

Module 8: Physical Intervention & Restraint Skills

Unit 1. Disengagements Skills (Breakaway) 1.1 A Strong Stable Base 1.2 Balance Points 1.3 Maximising Your Power 1.4 Releasing from Grips and Grabs 1.5 Defending against blows 1.6 A Safe Approach Unit 2. Physical Intervention & Restraint (Foundation Knowledge) 2.1 Interpretations 2.2 The purpose of Physical Intervention 2.3 Positive alternatives to Physical Intervention 2.4 Potential Medical Consequences 2.5 Risk Factors 2.6 Reducing Risk 2.7 Responsibilities following Physical Intervention 2.8 Refresher training 2.9 Accessing help and support 2.10 Learning from experience 2.11 Reporting and accounting for use of force Unit 3. Escorting & Holding Skills 3.1 Overcoming Inertia 3.2 Single Person Escorting & Holding Applications 3.3 Team Escorting & Holding Applications 3.4 Assisting Colleagues Unit 4. Intervention to stop an assault 4.1 Single Person Physical Intervention 4.2 Team Physical Intervention 4.3 De-escalating & Disengaging Unit 5. Physical Restraint 5.1 Prone Position Restraint 5.2 Transitioning from Prone to Supine 5.3 Supine Restraint 5.4 Protecting the head 5.5 Third Person support 5.6 Restraint on a bed/trolley 5.7 Use of Emergency Restraint Belts 5.8 Disengaging.

Flexible Training Delivery

e-learning

Apart from Module 8 (Physical Intervention & Restraint Skills), all of the learning can be completed online.

Alternatively, the training can be delivered to a group of learners in a classroom by a qualified AEGIS Trainer.

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